Should I put my (UK) Automatic into Neutral at stops?

2017-12-15 02:18:41

I have a Vauxhall diesel automatic with electronic handbrake.

Which of the following is the best procedure at a red light?

Leave in drive, foot on brake

Leave in drive, engage handbrake

Place in neutral, engage handbrake

Engage handbrake, place in neutral

Place in neutral, foot on brake

(For best, please consider both driver safety and mechanical wear)

tl; dr - Number 1.

Your Vauxhall is designed with an automatic transmission. The transmission has what's called a torque converter which couples the engine to the transmission. The torque converter has a stall speed. This means it will not throw power/torque at the transmission until the engine gets to a certain speed. Once it reaches the stall speed, power and torque will then start being applied. Stall speed will always be above idle speed. You can therefor leave it in drive while sitting at a red light without worry of damaging any internal parts or causing any extra wear in the transmission, engine, or drive

  • tl; dr - Number 1.

    Your Vauxhall is designed with an automatic transmission. The transmission has what's called a torque converter which couples the engine to the transmission. The torque converter has a stall speed. This means it will not throw power/torque at the transmission until the engine gets to a certain speed. Once it reaches the stall speed, power and torque will then start being applied. Stall speed will always be above idle speed. You can therefor leave it in drive while sitting at a red light without worry of damaging any internal parts or causing any extra wear in the transmission, engine, or drive train (as long as you let it idle).

    You have to have some sort of braking mechanism for your vehicle. Whether that's the handbrake or the regular brakes, that's what's in question. In this case, you should leave your hand brake alone and use the foot brake. There are a couple of reasons for this. First, this is what the foot brake was designed to do. It was designed to conv

    2017-12-15 02:45:57
  • EDIT

    Removed a certain point about the need for parked vehicles to use warning lights/brake lights as this point was admittedly not relevant to the answer, neither was it insightful.

    In remark to answers by @paulster and nick c. I guess there's no accepted convention here wrt using the handbrake at Signals. The brake lights serve their most important feature in indicating that a car is decelerating. This serves as a very essential reactionary aid. This is to do with how our brain figures out the apparent change in the relative distances. It uses perspective and apparent magnification. Both of these are slower than a trained response to the brake lights. Having an immediate visual aid significantly improves reaction and let's the trailing cars know of the drivers "intention" as soon as he touches the brake pedals.

    At a signal however, the benefit from a safety point of view becomes a little subjective, and I'm not sure which side to take.

    At long stops at a signal, I personally ten

    2017-12-15 03:13:12
  • Which of the following is the best procedure at a red light?

    'Place in neutral, foot on brake', because

    'Place in neutral, engage handbrake' can cause the driver to

    forget to disengage handbrake prior stepping the gas pedal to accelerate

    when the traffic light is green which causes the car to move

    with handbrake on.

    honda crv 2003 user manual recommends :

    'Neutral (N) − Use Neutral if you

    need to restart a stalled engine, or if

    it is necessary to stop briefly with

    the engine idling. Shift to Park position

    if you need to leave the vehicle

    for any reason. Press on the brake pedal

    when you are moving the shift

    lever from Neutral to another gear.'

    in

    http://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/OM/AH/ACR0303OM/enu/CR0303OM.PDF

    find 'neutral'

    from google (crv 2003 user manual) result 1

    page 206

    from

    'Funnily enough,

    2017-12-15 03:38:15
  • I'm going to have to disagree with Paul here - the correct answer is #2. You should always apply the handbrake when stationary for more than a few moments, and release the footbrake. If you keep your foot on the brake pedal, you keep your brake lights on, and so you dazzle the driver behind you - it is a simple matter of common courtesy.

    2017-12-15 03:51:50