A water cycle in an underground setting

2017-07-17 11:50:00

The ozone layer depleted beyond reasonable levels and life on the surface has become impossible and life migrated underground in giant caves connected together by tunnels.

Some of those caves have access to underground rivers or aquifers but some don't. That's the case of one of the biggest cave (size depends on what fits your answer) holding the principal city and many fields. In order to maintain this city and fields water is necessary hence the need for a water cycle.

What should the characteristics of my cave be in order to sustain a water cycle ?

The cave has access to sunlight with day/night cycle

Water cycle on surface requires few kilometers in the up direction (from sea level to the full extent of troposhere) and few thousands kilometers on the surface (water evaporated on the ocean falls as rain/snow on land and from there returns to the ocean).

Unless you want to call the planet a "cave with transparent ceiling" this cannot apply to a cave.

The cl

  • Water cycle on surface requires few kilometers in the up direction (from sea level to the full extent of troposhere) and few thousands kilometers on the surface (water evaporated on the ocean falls as rain/snow on land and from there returns to the ocean).

    Unless you want to call the planet a "cave with transparent ceiling" this cannot apply to a cave.

    The closest you can get is an equilibrium between evaporating water (from water free surface) and condensing water (on surfaces) through the air humidity. This will be particularly relevant when during the day your cave can become warmer and more humid and then overnight the moisture can condense on colder rocks.

    But this is just a smaller step in the cycle listed at the beginning of my answer.

    2017-07-17 12:58:38