Earliest attestation to Luke's gospel

2018-10-17 13:01:14

What is the earliest convincing attestation to the gospel of Luke? I believe that Justin Martyr quotes from Luke's gospel ca.150. Is that generally considered unassailable? Are there other earlier mentions?

Indisputable?

I agree with Frank Luke's comment, further adding that using such a term does technically make the question unanswerable (because, as Frank noted, people dispute things that ought not be).

Probable Testimony Circa 60-70 A.D.

The earliest probable reference to Luke's gospel is by the apostle Paul himself in 1 Tim 5:18, circa mid 60's A.D. (which of course depends upon one's view of the authorship and dating of that work).1 Regarding this verse, Wayne Grudem states:

The first quotation [of v.18] from “Scripture” is found in Deuteronomy 25:4, but

the second quotation, “The laborer deserves his wages,” is found

nowhere in the Old Testament. It does occur, however, in Luke 10:7

(with exactly the same words in the Greek text [see below]). So

  • Indisputable?

    I agree with Frank Luke's comment, further adding that using such a term does technically make the question unanswerable (because, as Frank noted, people dispute things that ought not be).

    Probable Testimony Circa 60-70 A.D.

    The earliest probable reference to Luke's gospel is by the apostle Paul himself in 1 Tim 5:18, circa mid 60's A.D. (which of course depends upon one's view of the authorship and dating of that work).1 Regarding this verse, Wayne Grudem states:

    The first quotation [of v.18] from “Scripture” is found in Deuteronomy 25:4, but

    the second quotation, “The laborer deserves his wages,” is found

    nowhere in the Old Testament. It does occur, however, in Luke 10:7

    (with exactly the same words in the Greek text [see below]). So here we have Paul

    apparently quoting a portion of Luke’s gospel and calling it

    “Scripture,” that is, something that is to be considered part

    of the canon.2

    He footnotes further as argument:

    Someone might object th

    2018-10-17 13:58:06
  • "The earliest probable reference to Luke's gospel is by the apostle Paul himself in 1 Tim 5:18, circa mid 60's A.D. (which of course depends upon one's view of the authorship and dating of that work).1 Regarding this verse, Wayne Grudem states."

    The answer is in the brackets, as the consensus of biblical scholars attest that 1 and 2 Timothy along with Titus are commonly known as the pastoral epistle are some of the unauthentic Pauline epistles. The scholarship is also in consensus with Mark being the first of the gospels with Matthew and Luke being copies taken from Mark (Synoptic) and "Q" or Quelle manuscript. None of the canonical gospels had authors names, it was not until the late 2nd century or early 3rd century that the names of the apostle were linked to them.

    However, one forgets that the disciples like Jesus were peasants and illiterate, we know this because the Greek NT states that Peter and John were uneducated/illiterate idiots/ανθρωποι αγραμματοι εισιν και ιδιωται. ΠΡ

    2018-10-17 14:13:31